Dorayaki ~

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If you are a fan of Japanese manga, you probably know who Doraemon is. Being a character created by Fujiko F. Fujio, he is a robot cat that traveled from the future to help the clumsy, lazy Nobita from being bullied and suffering misfortunes. The most wonderful thing about him is his pocket with all kinds of gadgets which made a kid like me drool. Even until now, I still sometimes say things like: “If only I had this … of Doraemon”. More than just a fictional character, Doraemon has been a great friend of mine since childhood, not Cinderella, not Little Mermaid, nor any fairty tale princes and princesses, but him.

Doraemon’s number 1 addiction is Dorayaki, which is basically fluffy pancakes with red bean fillings. I’ve always thought that this dessert is also ‘fictional’, since I did not even know the name, until very recently, full credit towards my baking obssession, which has led to many interesting dicovery. Even my clueless boyfriend guessed correctly after taking one glimpse at the final product. Doraemon totally made my day, as always!

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I followed the recipe from Nami’s Just one cookbook. I have been trying many of her recipes and not a single of them failed (well, with the exception of Daifuku Mochi, which totally blew). After coming across her Dorayaki so many times, I tell myself ‘one day’ I have to try it, and that one fine day has finally come. The pancakes come out perfectly in round shape, with its nicely cooked colour and soft, yet tangy texture, with the sweetness of red bean paste, I couldn’t ask for more, but a cup of green tea to go with it.

Dorayaki

INGREDIENTS:

  • 4 eggs
  • 140g sugar
  • 1 tbs honey
  • 160g all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 2 tbs water
  • Red bean paste, as much as you like

METHOD:

  • Combine egg, sugar and honey in a bowl. Hand whisk until the mixture gets fluffly and foamy
  • Sift flour and baking powder into the bowl and mix well
  • Refrigerate to chill for 15 minutes
  • Add in water, 1/2 tbs at a time and stir well. The mixture should be a bit thick to ensure the pancakes are fluffy
  • Heat a non stick frying pan on medium heat. Dip a tissue in oil and lightly coat the bottom of the pan
  • Fry the pancake until its surface has started to form ‘bubble’ then flip to the other side to cook
  • Transfer to a plate and cover with damp towel, continue with the rest of the mixture
  • Sandwich red bean paste between two pancakes and serve

Notes:

  1. It is important that the bottom of the pan is ‘even’ to ensure even cooking
  2. Oil should be kept to the minimum, otherwise the pancake would have this ‘leopard’ looking skin
  3. Drop the batter from certain height about the pan when frying, they will nice spread to form this perfect round shape
  4. When making sandwich, put more red bean in a center, making a little ‘dome’ so Dorayaki would be ‘curved’

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I halved the recipe as I was going for a trial, and everything went so smoothly I couldn’t get any happier with my baking. Gutted I didn’t trust myself into making a handful of them, so here I am, craving for some more Dorayaki yet again. And look at these flowers, aren’t they a real beauty?

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P.S. My dorayaki has been featured in Tastespotting, yippiee!

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2 thoughts on “Dorayaki ~

  1. Hi Phuong! Thanks for trying my recipe and I’m glad you liked it. Also, thank you for trying many of my recipes as well (Was strawberry daifuku hard to make? I had to practice some time to make good looking ones.). Your dorayaki have very nice color and look like one from Japanese traditional confectionery store. Thanks for linking back to me. :)

    • Thank you for your kind words, and there I was, worrying that my Dorayaki might be a little bit burnt. The pancakes were a hit and this recipe of yours is definitely in my favourites.

      I had quite a struggle with daifuku, followed your recipe precisely and ended up looking like anything-but-a-mochi. I should keep practicing on shaping pretty little mochi like yours :)

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